Cucumber, pickled

Cucumber, pickled

A pickled cucumber (commonly known as a pickle in the United States and Canada and a gherkin in Britain, Ireland, Australia, South Africa and New Zealand) is a cucumber that has been pickled in a brine, vinegar, or other solution and left to ferment for a period of time, by either immersing the cucumbers in an acidic solution or through souring by lacto-fermentation. Pickled cucumbers are often part of mixed pickles.

Pickled cucumber Nutrition Facts: Calories, Carbs, and Health Benefits

Pickled cucumber is 76.2% water, contains 21.15% carbohydrates, 0.41% fat, and 0.58% protein. One medium pickled cucumber supplies you with 13.748 grams of carbohydrates, which is 10.58 percent of the minimum of 130 grams of carbohydrates you should have daily, according to the Institute of Medicine (US). That same it has an energy value of 379 kJ (91 Calories) in a 100 g (3.5 Oz) amount and is an important source of Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) (52.33% of the Daily Value). So if your diet contains pickled cucumbers, it helps your body to stabilise blood clots and heal wounds faster, regulate concentration of calcium in the blood, retent of episodic memory (in older people) and it is effective against excessive bleeding, osteoporosis by regulating calcium levels and high cholesterol level. With this it contains an appreciable amount of Sodium attaining 30.47% of the Daily Value in a 100 g (3.5 Oz).