Dill, dried

Dill, dried

Dill leaves are useful herb or spice needed in flavoring food especially in Europe and Central Asia. Dill leaves could be fresh or dried. When fresh, it has its flavor intact, but it tends to lose some of those when dried. However, freeze-dried dill leaves could retain it flavor for quite a while.

Uses

Dried dill Nutrition Facts: Calories, Carbs, and Health Benefits

Dried dill is 7.3% water, contains 55.82% carbohydrates, 4.36% fat, and 19.96% protein. If you consume one teaspoon of ground dried dill you will get 0.558 grams of carbohydrates. It is equal to 0.43 percent of the 130 grams of carbohydrates you should include in your daily diet. That same it has an energy value of 1059 kJ (253 Calories) in a 100 g (3.5 Oz) amount and is an excellent source of Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), Vitamin C (ascorbic acid), and Vitamin A (total, RAE) (131.54%, 66.67%, and 41.86% of the Daily Value, respectively). So if your diet contains dried dill, it helps your body to produce red blood cells (RBCs) and neurotransmitters, maintain metabolism of fats and carbohydrates into monosaccharides, break down peptides into amino acid monomers so that it can be used in the body and it is effective against mood disorders like depression, because vitamin B6 is responsible for creating neurotransmitters and regulates emotions through hormones like serotonin and dopamine, Alzheimer’s disease with the help of other vitamins and anemia. Furthermore it contains an appreciable amount of Iron, Manganese and Calcium attaining 271%, 219.44% and 178.4% of the Daily Value in a 100 g (3.5 Oz), respectively.